DISORDER

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YEAR: 2012
PROFESSOR: MATTHEW SPREMULLI
TEAM: ANDREW MACMILLAN AND JUNE LEE
LOCATION: UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO

 

A sound installation which performs a spatial operation using auditory mechanisms to dissolve the liminal space which exists in between two disparate environments. Inserted into the quiet setting of the staircase at 1 Spadina Cresent, Disorder creates an atmosphere of physical and acoustic disorientation. The tubes disrupt the circulation of the staircase with a maze-like obstruction. The channeling of sound bites from the outside creates a discomforting acoustic experience which in effect obscures the sense of being inside the stairwell at all, and begins to dissolve the barrier between inside and outside through. This is achieved through a disordering of spatial and sensory experience.

 

The series of images on the adjacent page reveal the movement path through the tubes by an individual interacting with the installation. Each image shows a tube in sequential order as the individual reaches it and is drawn to listen to the sounds on the other side of the wall.

These conceptual diagrams illustrate the disruption of movement and the filtering of sound which occurs with the insertion of the device. The first sectional diagram provides the context for the last two drawings. The last diagram abstracts the circulation of the stairs to reveal the difference in the once regularized flow of moving through the stairs.

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The previous series of images reveal the movement path through the tubes by an individual interacting with the installation. Each image shows a tube in sequential order as the individual reaches it and is drawn to listen to the sounds on the other side of the wall.

These conceptual diagrams illustrate the disruption of movement and the filtering of sound which occurs with the insertion of the device. The first sectional diagram provides the context for the last two drawings. The last diagram abstracts the circulation of the stairs to reveal the difference in the once regularized flow of moving through the stairs.